Pinot Carbonic Maceration

Blueberry Mace: A vinification technique in beer brewing

Brewing beer is a science with a process that remains the same for nearly every batch: grind, mash, sparge, boil, chill, pitch, ferment, and package.  When I come across a new technique or idea that seems foreign, I get pretty excited over the process and potential outcome.  I come back to the classics like Oktoberfest and hoppy pale ales, but when I brewed my first Berliner Weisse and bottled my fist blended mixed fermented sour, my research went beyond process.  I went into not just the hows but also the whys and my understanding of brewing science expanded.  I’m going beyond beer brewing techniques with my Blueberry Mace recipes.   I’ll start with a Lambic and an Oud Bruin and blend them with blueberries or grapes that have undergone a wine process: carbonic maceration. 

Pinot Carbonic Maceration

Pinot Carbonic Maceration

Carbonic maceration is a process that occurs when intact bunches of red grapes (or another fruit with a skin like blueberries)  are fermented in a sealed vessel that has first been filled with carbon dioxide. In the absence of oxygen, these intact berries begin a fermentation process inside the skin of the berries.  Carbonic maceration produces a low-tannin and fruity wine.  This process is anaerobic, so the fruit takes up carbon dioxide and breaks down sugar.  More importantly, it breaks down the tarty-tasting malic acid (that is found in high levels in grapes and blueberries) into pyruvate, acetaldehyde and then finally ethanol. Polyphenols like tannins from the skin are absorbed into the pulp and broken down. Amino acids are also broken down and can develop precursors to develop esters. One ester, ethyl cinnamate, develops strawberry or raspberry components.  Another, benzaldehyde, can produce cherry and almond-like flavors.  Carbonic maceration fermentation time-frames are dependent on brix, fruit quantity, and temperature.  I look for grapes in the low to mid-20s brix and blueberries around 15 brix.  I’m aiming to blend 1.5-2.5% ABV fruit with each beer.  Carbonic maceration raises pH levels, so I will need to keep the system sealed and free of oxygen to prevent acetobacter from taking over.  I may need to use another vinification technique to keep the ABV that low- the addition of potassium sorbate. 

So the goal here for my beers is to blend a complex and intense fruit flavor with very low tannins.  I’ll separate the fermented juice from the skins after carbonic maceration to further reduce any tannins.  Each one one of these beers will require different amounts of blends, so I’ll do some taste-testing of the fruit post-fermentation and blending experiments with each beer.  I want a stable product, so I’ll filter out the yeast from the beer prior to blending.  

Lambic with grapes and Lambic with blueberries

I’ll blend 3 gallons of carbonic macerated Baco Noir grapes per gallon and 5 gallons of carbonic macerated blueberries

Batch Size (Gal): 6.0
Total Grain (Lbs): 12.75
Anticipated OG: 1.053
Anticipated SRM: 3.6
Anticipated IBU: Less than 4
Brewhouse Efficiency: 69 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain Bill

6.5 lbs German Pils (2.0 SRM)  51 %
5 lbs Flaked Wheat Malt (1.6 SRM) 39.2 %
1 lbs Flaked Corn (1.3 SRM)  7.8 %
4.0 oz Acid Malt (3.0 SRM) 2 %

Hops

3.0 oz Saaz (aged 15 months) – Boil 90.0 min

Yeast

House Clean Yeast similar to Wyeast 1056 1L starter

Wyeast 3278 Lambic Blend

Water Profile

Madison, WI cut 1:1 with RO Water.  3 g  Gypsum, 2 g salt, and 6 g calcium chloride added to the mash water.

Final profile:

Ca – 85
Mg – 9.7
Na – 25.4
Cl – 125.9
SO4 – 54.2
HCO – 29.75

Mash Profile

Infusion – 154F for 90 min.
H2O:Grain – 1.25 qt/lb
Mash pH – 5.54

Sour Brown with Grapes and Blueberries 

I’ll blend 3 gallons of carbonic macerated Baco Noir grapes per gallon and 5 gallons of carbonic macerated blueberries per gallon

Batch Size (Gal): 6.0
Total Grain (Lbs): 15.75
Anticipated OG: 1.063
Anticipated SRM: 16.4
Anticipated IBU: 11.6 (Rager)
Brewhouse Efficiency: 67.9 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain Bill

12.5 lbs Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM)  77.8 %
2 lbs Munich 20 Malt (20 SRM) 12.7 %
8 oz  melanoidin  Malt (20 SRM)  3.2 %
8 oz  Crystal 80 Malt (80 SRM)  3.2 %
4 oz  chocolate  malt (350 SRM)  1.6 %
4 oz  acid Malt (3.0 SRM)  1.6 %

Hops
0.60 oz East Kent Goldings (UK) – Boil 60.0 min

Yeast
House Clean Yeast similar to Wyeast 1056 1L starter
1 pkg of Wyeat Roselare Blend
Dregs from a 2013 bottle of Bruery’s Tart of Darkness

Water Profile 

Madison, WI cut 1:3 with RO Water.  8 g  Gypsum and 8 g CaCl added to the mash water.

Final profile:

Ca – 145.6
Mg – 17.2
Na – 4.7
Cl – 121.5
SO4 – 136.4
HCO – 106

Mash Profile
Infusion – 154F for 75 min.
H2O:Grain – 1.25 qt/lb
Mash pH – 5.41

Boss Door de Bomen Tasting

Many of you that have entered competitions, may be able to relate with me.   I value the feedback from the score sheets because it’s on a stage I can’t get elsewhere, but man that low score hurt.  Boss Door de Bomen was the first sour I was willing to enter.  I liked everything about it.  It was a challenge to brew it, and while fun, a challenge to blend.  Boss Door de Bomen

I entered Bishop-Rye Saison with Brett in to the same competition and it took first place.  I was excited about that, but when I got the scores back for Bos Door de Bomen, I looked at every step,  every process, every detail from recipe to temp control.  I bottled Boss Door de Bomen in 12 oz longnecks and 750 ml Belgian bottles.  I’ve noticed a difference in flavor in each That I’d like to investigate further if this will happen with my other sour styles.  I entered the 12 oz longnecks in competition and I’ll probably enter the Belgians at some point to see how differently they are scored.

I’ve had a few others try this including my Atascadero Brewing Company partner Josh.  He had similar feedback that the judges provided: a slight medicinal flavor.  This is most likely from the 4-ethylphenol produce by the brett.  I’ll create a competition page soon and have my scores and feedback sheet included there. For now, you can read what I thought of Boss Door de Bomen.

Appearance – Cloudy copper/reddish with a thin white head that does not fade quickly.

Aroma  – Delicious cherry pie with a sour smell that makes my eyes scrunch up

Mouthfeel – Prickly with a mild sour bite.  Some tannin astringency that is not unpleasant.  Thick mouthfeel for such a well aged beer.

Flavor –  Fruit throughout with a sweet tart and tannin flavor from the oak on the back end.  More acetic notes than is common for the style.  Maybe too much.   

Overall- I’ve tasted this both out of 750 ml Belgian bottles and out of 12 oz longnecks.  They tasted different each time.  The ability of the critters to surprise each time is amazing.  I entered the longneck in the competition and the results were horrific!  I taste a much more complex and delicious beer from the 750 ml bottles.For future batches, I’ll reduce and control temps and limit the amount of oxygen by tasting less often and flushing with CO2 when necessary.  

 

 

Central Coast Terroir

Central Coast Terrior“Good farmers, who take seriously their duties as stewards of Creation and of their land’s inheritors, contribute to the welfare of society in more ways than society usually acknowledges, or even knows. These farmers produce valuable goods, of course; but they also conserve soil, they conserve water, they conserve wildlife, they conserve open space, they conserve scenery.”

- Wendell Berry

I first met my friend and Atascadero Brewing Company business partner Josh Fugette in Austin, TX in spring of 2009.  Josh was studying biology at Texas State and I was working for a Conservation nonprofit in New England.  Fueled by the passions of community and adventure, I was traveling to Texas to present internship opportunities for the National Park Service. I set out to convince Texas college students they could change the world one outdoor internship opportunity at a time.

Josh called me after he found my number posted for an internship.  We met over lunch in what could be considered one of Austin’s “bad” neighborhoods, but oh, the local food at the Peruvian restaurant was amazing.  Our conversation about community and growing what we eat locally was even better.  Josh was a volunteer at an Austin-based organic farm that put these concepts into practice and I saw first hand by volunteering with him on a pleasant Austin spring day. With our own hands, we planted what Austin residents would eat.  We sowed actual seeds with sustainability in mind. Little did we know that six years later, we would be putting these concepts into practice together with Atascadero Brewing Company.

In September of 2015, we plan to begin production in Atascadero.  Our beer will be brewed with sustainability, quality, and community in mind.

Connecting to the Community of Local Farmers and Businesses 

There is nothing better than popping a fresh raspberry in your mouth grown with a farmer’s respect and care, sipping a cup of coffee with beans freshly roasted that morning and sourced with quality in mind, the taste of oysters pulled out of Morro Bay that have that perfect salinity balance, or locally malted grain that truly brings out the terroir of the Central Coast from a beer.  At Atascadero Brewing Company, Josh and I plan to connect with as many farmers and businesses along the Central Coast that hold values of quality over all.  We plan to build partnerships to produce the very best locally produced and sustainable beer possible.  Imagine the possibilities with a Central Coast Raspberry Saison, an Atascadero Coffee Porter, or a Morro Bay Oyster Stout.  These connections can be endless and the possibilities excite the palate.Smelling Central Coast Terrior

Building Community and Promoting Local Business 

As Josh and I talked about growing Atascadero Brewing Company, we realized that we are only part of our success.  Sure, we know that we can brew world-class beer that many will enjoy, but we want to do it with sustainability in mind and quality can be a big part of that.  To do so, we need the help of our neighbors and partners.  We don’t just want to brew quality local beer sustainably, but we want to be the marketing outlet for the community and for our partners to market our world-class beer as well.  We’ll co-brand our quality products together.  As we grow so do our partners. As our partners grow, we grow.

A New Adventure

As we embark on this adventure, these are concepts that will drive our motivation.  We not only want to make great beer, but we want to help create a better community.  We have acknowledged the value that businesses and farmers help us to achieve this.

Firestone Walker Tour and DBA Clone

Firestone Walker Brewhouse

Re:Find Distillery’s Josh Fuggette (left) and Firestone Walker masterbrewer Matt Bryndilson.

I love breweries, brewers, and beers that push the edges of brewing guidelines. Firestone Walker, Matt Bryndilson, and Double Barrel Ale (DBA) fit perfectly into that mindset. Before heading to the Central Coast to hang out with my buddy and Re:find Distillery assistant distiller Josh Fugette, I knew that I wanted to visit Firestone Walker and have a few of their beers that I can’t enjoy easily in Wisconsin. My last day along the Central Coast was spent hiking with Josh and then we headed to a tour of Firestone Walker with Josh and master brewer Bryndilson.  Villicana Winery and Re:find Distillery owner Alex Villicana was kind enough to set this up and I was disapointed that Alex couldn’t join us.
As a homebrewer, I’ve benefited from Bryndilson’s brewing knowledge and advice through articles and podcasts, so needless to say I was excited to meet him in person and learn about Firestone Walker’s brewery operations. Though, I’m now more excited to learn from him during the CBA program at the American Brewers Guild next summer.

FW2

The Firestone Walker barrel room. Man, it smelled amazing in there.

I like to formulate my own recipes and swap out ingredients or change a process to learn as much as I can about brewing, so I don’t brew very many clones. Matt’s  tour inspired me to brew a Double Barrel Clone.  I obviously didn’t recreate the Firestone union system in which they ferment a portion of several of their beers.  I used medium toast oak chips, though I would have preferred to use cubes, but both the Wine and Hop Shop and Brew and Grow in Madison were out of the cubes.  I’ll leave the chips in secondary for about half the time I would the cubes-about a week.  I hope it imparts an oaky vanilla favor that is balances with the maltiness that’s DBA is know for.

The following clone was adapted from Can you Brew It interview with Bryndildson with modifications for my system.

 

 

 

 

Stats
Batch Size (Gal): 6.0
Total Grain (Lbs): 12.13
Anticipated OG: 1.053
Anticipated SRM: 15.8
Anticipated IBU: 32 (Rager)
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70.0%
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain Bill
10.0 lbs Maris Otter
1.0 lbs Crystal 10
12 oz Munich
4 oz Crystal 120
2 oz Chocolate

Hops
0.50 oz Magnum @ 60 min
0.65 oz EKG @30 min
0.75 EKG @ flameout
0.75 Fuggle @ Flameout

Yeast
WLP 002

Mash Profile
Mash at 145F for 45 minutes, step up to 156F for 15 min
Two batch sparges at 168F

Fermentation Profile
Pitched yeast at 65F and raised to 68F over 24 hours.  Added 1.0 oz oak chips and fermented for 14 days.

Morro: Is it a Saison or is it a Lambic?

In Fall of 2013, motivated by my trip to the Central Coast, I set out to brew the best saisons I could.  Not just a saison with the great balance of fruity and spicy, a soft malt flavor, and the slickness from the yeast, but original saisons that challenge the norm and expectations of what a saison should be. I started the Nine Sisters Saison project.

 

I’ve had some degree of success. Cabrillo – Hoppy Rye Saison took second place at the Badger Brew Off and Bishop – Rye Saison with brett took first place at the 2014 Wisconsin State Fair.  I adore both those beers.  After bottling Bishop, I did a 50-50 blended of my 2012 lambic that I put on raspberries in fall 2013.  The non-carbonated test tasted like fruit juice with a touch of spiciness and a mild sourness.  I ended up bottling seven cases with enough table sugar to achieve about 3.0 volumes of CO2.

 

Morro with hydrometer

Bishop

Stats
Batch Size (Gal): 5.5
Total Grain (Lbs): 12.5
Anticipated OG: 1.060
Anticipated SRM: 4.2
Anticipated IBU: 21.6 (Rager)
Brewhouse Efficiency: 79.8%
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

9 lbs Belgian Pilsner  (2.0 SRM)  75 %
3 lb Rye malt  (3.5 SRM) 25%
8 oz Turbinado sugar  added in the boil

Hops
1.5 oz Styrian Celeia (4.0% AA)– Boil 60.0 min
0.5 oz Styrian Celeia (4.0% AA)– Boil 10.0 min

Yeast
Wyeast 3711 French Saison 1.5L starter
WLP 650 – one tube added to secondary

Water Profile

Madison, WI cut 1:1 with RO water.  4g  Gypsum and 1 g CaCl added to the mash water.
Sparged with two batches of 100% RO water

Final profile:

Ca – 69.2
Mg – 9.7
Na – 14.3
Cl – 67.5
SO4 – 71.5
HCO – 0.525

 

Mash Profile
Single infusion at 149F
sparge at 168F

Mash pH – 5.31

Fermentation Profile
Pitch yeast at 68 F and ferment until gravity is around 1.015-1.018.  I’ll add Brett B to the secondary and raise the temp to 75-85F until fully attenuated.

 

Lambic

Stats

Batch Size (Gal): 6.0
Total Grain (Lbs): 12.75
Anticipated OG: 1.053
Anticipated SRM: 3.6
Anticipated IBU: Less than 4
Brewhouse Efficiency: 69 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain Bill

6.5 lbs German Pils (2.0 SRM)  51 %
5 lbs Flaked Wheat Malt (1.6 SRM) 39.2 %
1 lbs Flaked Corn (1.3 SRM)  7.8 %
4.0 oz Acid Malt (3.0 SRM) 2 %

Hops

3.0 oz Saaz (aged 15 months) – Boil 90.0 min

Yeast

House Clean Yeast similar to Wyeast 1056 1L starter

Wyeast 3278 Lambic Blend

Water Profile

Madison, WI cut 1:1 with RO Water.  3 g  Gypsum, 2 g salt, and 6 g calcium chloride added to the mash water.

Final profile:

Ca – 85
Mg – 9.7
Na – 25.4
Cl – 125.9
SO4 – 54.2
HCO – 29.75

Mash Profile

Infusion – 154F for 90 min.
H2O:Grain – 1.25 qt/lb
Mash pH – 5.54

Fermentation Profile
Pitch yeast at 68 F and ferment at 64F for 7 days
Raise Temp to 70 F and ferment for 10 days
Take out of chamber and put in the basement to age and let the bugs do their work

Raspberries added in Fall 2013

Brewing School: Why I chose the American Brewers Guild

Image

 

Last November, I was offered a job as a QA manager/Assistant Brewer at Millstream Brewery in Amana, IA.  Masterbrewer Chris Priebe would have been amazing to learn the craft from.  The owners of Millstream also offered me a living wage and were working on a finding me a place to live in the area.  It was ridiculously painful to turn Millstream down. They wanted someone long-term and while there isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t second guess my decision, I knew I had plans beyond Iowa.

A solid brewing education before jumping into the business is part of my plan.  There are accomplished probrewers  that enter the business without a brewing education and that works well for many.  For myself, I want a combination of a well-rounded education and proving my worth though experience.  The next step was to choose a school.

While new programs are being developed though the US, there are a limited number of  program options specifically designed to advance quickly into a master brewers position. Below are the two options I seriously considered with pros and cons based entirely on my needs and goals:

 

Siebel Institute of Technology- WBA International Diploma in Brewing Technology Program 

Siebel has a great reputation in the industry and brewers from both craft and macro-breweries have graduated from the program.  This a 12-week program is split between the Chicago campus and the Doemens Academy in Munich.  The first six weeks is in Chicago as part of the WBA Associate Program that focuses on different brewing technology modules.  The second six weeks is the European Brewing Study Tour.  This is a very thorough and concise program.  I heard some say that it can be intense with a lot of information in a very short period of time.  The cost for this program is one of the highest at $18,500 ($16,800 for early registration).  There are prerequisite courses for this program including biology and you need to be approved prior to applying.  I exchanged emails with the vice-president Keith Lemke and after a quick discussion, I was approved to apply. I exchanged emails with Keith in fall of 2011 and I believe since then the requirements for approval have been tightened.

I like the reputation that Siebel holds in the industry and the prospect of learning the trade from some of the best in the world in both Chicago and Germany is a huge draw.  Siebel has some courses online, but the WBA International Diploma in Brewing Technology Program or the Associates do not have this option. When the price tag for this program is half that of a salary for a year for many brewers, it does make it a difficult choice. There is a $2,500 fee to hold your seat and full payment is required prior to the beginning of the program.

 

American Brewers Guild Craft Brewers Apprenticeship (CBA) program.

This is a 28-week program with 22 weeks of intensive online  microbiological and engineering brewing study, one week on campus at the Drop-In Brewery in Vermont, followed by an internship at a participating brewery.  They have participating breweries in every state and some include Ommegang, Goose Island, Firestone Walker, and Lost Abbey.

When I first looked at the American Brewers Guild, I had misgivings about grasping difficult brewing engineering and science topics though distance learning. They have online examples that quelled some of my fears, but not all.   There is long waiting list for this limited-class size program.  As of April 2014, all programs are full until January 2016. I believe that Siebel has employment assistance, but ABG specifically outlines this on their site.  The prerequisites are many and include  algebra or calculus and one of college level chemistry, microbiology, physics, or engineering.  Once accepted, $1000 is required to hold your seat and subsequent payments are required but before the program starts and just before the 5-week internship begins.

While I have reservations about online learning, I like that I can complete this program while I’m still earning money at my current job.  I also like that full payment (though most of it is) isn’t required until after the 22 weeks of the online program are completed.  Anytime I mention the program to probrewers, that have a lot of good things to say about founder Steve Parkes and the program. I met Firestone Walker Masterbrewer Matt Brynildson last October and asked him about the CBA. He said that he wouldn’t hesitate to hire someone that has a diploma from the ABG. Hearing him say that added a great deal of credibility to the importance of the ABG in the industry for me.

 

UC- Davis Master Brewers Program 

A big draw to this 18-week program is that it’s instructors Michael Lewis and Charles Bamforth are well respected in the industry.  This program is intensive and on-campus with preparation for the Institute of Brewing and Distilling (IBD), London, Diploma in Brewing Examination and developing skills to work as masterbrewers  in the industry as key components.  The UC- Davis Master Brewers Program has similar prerequisites as the other programs I’ve considered  and an extensive post-program support.  If I was 10 years younger, UC-Davis would be top on my list.

My Decision

With this decision, I had to consider the financial component and balance that with the benefits of the program. If I had the option to learn without earning an income, I would begin the  WBA International Diploma in Brewing Technology Program at Siebel as soon as possible.  I have some pretty good friends in California and that draws me to the UC-Davis program.  Considering the cost, quality of education (with credibility from well respected masterbrewers) and link to my goals, the CBA program at ABG makes the most sense.  I’ll have the financial and educational flexibility to be where I want to be a year from now.

I was accepted into the CBA program in September 2013 and I’ll start in June 2015 .  I’ll document my process and adventures along the way between now and then.  Of which I hope there will be many.

Re:Find Rye Whiskey Barrel Stout with brett

Barrel Stout

Adding the Oatmeal Stout to the Re:Find barrel.

I really like the aroma of bretanomyces bruxellensis when it’s used as a subtle undertone.  Goose Island’s saison Matilda is a pretty good example and at the 2013 Door County Beer Fest, Door County Brewing Company had brett in their porter that went pretty quickly.  I hope they bring it back this year. I also find the descriptions of brett brux pretty ridiculous: Horse blanket, cow pasture, dairy farm, compost pile, “ …urine soaked hay (in a good way).”  Really?! Urine?! How can that be a good thing?

I didn’t fully comprehend this until I brewed another Bishop Rye Saison and pitched 300 ml of slurry from the first batch.  The brett completely dominated the smells emanating from the Better Bottle.  It started as a pleasantly sweet leather aroma and by the third day, a compost smell took over.  I’m not sure this second batch will be used for anything more than blending with other funky

and sour beers at very small ratios, but I’ll let it ride out and see where it comes out.

I really like how the Re:Fined Rye Whiskey Barrel stout turned out and I wonder how it would taste with a hint of brett.  I stepped up a drop of WLP 650 and I’ll used that in the stout.  The process was pretty simple.

I saved the tube of WLP 650 that had less than a ml of brett brux left. I made a 1 L starter for the Wyeast 1318 London Ale III that I will be pitching in the stout and saved 50 ml of 1.025 (6.25 plato) wort to add to the tube.  I thought that the worst that could happen would be a loss of 50 ml of wort.  I’ve lost more during a boil over.  It took about 36 hours, but the brett took off without too much trouble.  By the fourth day the brett

settled out to the bottom of the tube.

The next set-up I added 100 ml of 1.05 SG (6.35 plato) wort to the tube which filled it to the base of the cap. within 12 hours, fermentation took off and at 36 hours about 10 ml of nice white yeast floculated and settled  to the bottom of the tube.

After a full week of fermenting in a better bottle at 65F, I racked the stout into the Re:Find barrel.  The barrel had two different stouts and a healthy dose of  a potassium metabisultphite/citric acid solution in it previously, so I plan on aging it in the barrel for at least a month.  I’m not ready for this barrel to take on bugs, so I’ll wait to pitch the brett until after I take it out of the barrel.

WLP 650 step-up One

This is step one with 50 ml of wort added to about one ml of WPL 650

 

Stats
Batch Size (Gal): 5.5 
Total Grain (Lbs): 15.50
Anticipated OG: 1.071
Anticipated SRM: 39
Anticipated IBU: 62 (Rager)
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70.2%
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain Bill
12 lbs Maris Otter
1.25 lbs Flaked oats
12 oz Chocolate
8 oz Roasted barley
4 oz Black Barley
8 oz Caramel 120

Hops
0.75 oz Warrior @ 60 min
0.5 Columbus @15 min
0.5 EKG @ flameout

Yeast
Wyeast 1318 London Ale III one L starter
WLP 650 stepped up from less than a ml of yeast.

Mash Profile
Single infusion at 158F for 60 minutes
Two batch sparges at 168F

Fermentation Profile
Pitched yeast at 65F and held for 7 days then put at ambient in the oak barrel.

Notes
4/6/14 – Brewed by myself. my Efficiency was much higher than anticipated and got an OG of 1.081.  I boiled water and added 1.o gallons to bring the OG to 1.065.  Pitched 1.0 L of wyeast 1318 at 65F into 6 gallons of wort.

4/13/14 –  Racked to the re:Find barrel. A solution of potassium metabisultphite/citric acid was in the barrel previously.  I rinsed the barrel with near boiling water before racking.

5/5/14 – Bottled 2.5 gallons. Racked 2 gallons and pitched the stepped-up Brett Brux.

7/18/14 – The second batch of the Rye saison with brett mentioned in this post  that had the 300 ml of yeast slurry turned out very well. The organic acids combined nicely with the alcohols to produce some tasty esters.  I blended the 2nd batch with 2012 Lambic and bottled enough for seven cases.